Toni Erdmann
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Toni Erdmann

Probably since The Life of Others, in 2006, Woman Walks Ahead German cinema had not been as proud of itself as it is now that Toni Erdmann has made it to theaters. While, and as often happens with the best jewelry, at first the tape went almost unnoticed everywhere, even within the German borders. In this sense, nobody questions that Look Who’s Back, the title that won the Bambi Award for Best Film in 2016 – the most similar to the Oscar in Germany – is a competent film and, because of its thematic, even necessary, but next to the elegant subtlety of Toni Erdmann this farce about the supposed return of Hitler from the dead seems crazy, cold and vulgar.

The film by filmmaker Maren Ade, on the other hand, Colossal is distinguished by having a unique poetic that at times recalls those amateur but very inspired lines of the first Wim Wenders, although without ever abandoning the realism that permeates each frame. In fact, the plot of the film could not be more specific: a young German woman addicted to work and who has moved to Bucharest for work, is reunited with his extravagant father after he goes through a depressive picture after losing his dog. Enunciated in this way, one could venture to think that he will find before him an argument a thousand times seen and where there is little margin for surprise. After all, even the most seasoned of moviegoers has reviewed more Hollywood products than any other type. Although, the success of Ade consists precisely Collateral Beauty in having played the conventions in order to reduce the predictability of its history and, in addition, without at any time being assessed, which is an enormous merit. Also, he shied away from the temptation to impose a moral aspect to his film or to judge the characters that inhabit it. Ines, the daughter, brilliantly played by Sandra Hüller, is presented to us as she is, with all her ambitions and selfishness, as an addict to work, cocaine and loneliness. But an identical treatment is given to Winfried Conradi / Toni Erdmann – incarnated in a sublime way by the Austrian Peter Simonischek – a pathetic man, a loser in the broad sense of the word who, however, and despite presenting a behavior extracted from A book of psychiatric notes, has found a way to face life, or to surround it or, if you prefer to see it like that, to deal with it. Contrary, but also old The Edge of Seventeen acquaintances, those two antithetical worlds collide without having the slightest idea of ​​what can emerge from that clash besides the pain, anger and incomprehension of always. Despite this, they let themselves be carried away by inertia, perhaps because they sense that behind the impulse there is something else that they may not have been able to or have not wanted to see in all these years, or only because, after all, they do not have much left more than losing.

Duration: 162 min

Release:

IMDb: 7.4

Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann
Toni Erdmann