Every Day
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Every Day

When it comes to romantic matchups, Hollywood has never been particularly shy about pairing a conventional human being with a fluky, not-of-this-earth  Love & Friendship partner: a mermaid, a superhero, King Kong, or Zach Galifianakis. But “Every Day,” an adaptation of David Levithan’s 2012 young-adult novel, marks a surprisingly original entry in the genre of fanciful mismatched love story.

The film’s heroine, Rhiannon (Angourie Rice), is an effervescent, tuned-in, and utterly normal teenager growing up in a woodsy suburb of Baltimore. The Home Again character she falls head over heels for is…a spirit. One who takes over the mind and body of a different local teenager every day, until the clock strikes midnight, at which point the spirit moves on to somebody else. The spirit, whose name is A., can occupy a boy or a girl, of any shape, size, or ethnicity, but he/she is always kind, thoughtful, sharp, funny, observant, and compassionate. Kind of like Jesus meets Zendaya.

You could say — and you’d be right — that “Every Day” is a highly derivative movie, since it contains echoes of a great many other fantasy-contraption love stories. The way A. wakes up each morning in the body a different person, greeting the day with a who-am-I-now? variation on the one before it (and setting the phone alarm for 11:00 and 11:50 p.m., like something out of a digital-age Cinderella), is an obvious variation on the premise of “Groundhog Day.” The passing of a persona, like a baton, from one actor to the next owes a debt to Todd Solondz’ extraordinarily underrated satirical fantasia “Palindromes” (2005). And the way that “Every Day” plays around with issues of love and personality First Kill — Rhiannon isn’t just falling for an image, she’s falling for a soul — is like the YA version of a conceit out of the Charlie Kaufman pretzel-of-identity playbook.

Duration: 97 min

Release:

IMDb: 6.3

Every Day
Every Day
Every Day
Every Day
Every Day
Every Day
Every Day
Every Day