Bleed for This
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Bleed for This

For more than 15 years it has been difficult for me to explain the work I do during the week. Especially the part of being attentive to men of marked musculature that are mounted on a stage and remove all the clothes except The Emoji Movie  a tiny piece of underwear. I’m not a male striptease consultant at all. The weighings prior to the boxing matches do not look like anything else. Narrating fights week after week on national television generates respect for boxers. There is texture and passion in boxing, factors that have made it the highest preference resource of all time to build Hollywood stories. There are at least some aspects.

The spent dramas in crescendo of final assaults are a comfortable tool for filmmakers. But the day before, the weighing? Almost no director includes it. Or they just put it as a useful scenario to exchange insults.

But before that is presented the biographical film “Bleed For This” of the year 2016, which tells the story of five-time champion Vinny Paz. In what is one of the most authentic scenes I have seen in a boxing movie, the New Yorker Ben Younger perfectly Exposed captures the weighing of Paz and Roger Mayweather before their fight, 26 years ago. Younger captures it. Your movie captures it.

Let’s forget the trite approaches when valuing boxing movies. You know, the reviews written by boxing fans in which the authenticity of the Sweet Virginia film is based on how similar to reality the action in the ring looks. Although it is not a bad criterion, it is irrelevant here.

Duration: 117 min

Release:

IMDb: 6.8

Bleed for This
Bleed for This